5 great walks around Arnside and Silverdale

All of the Holgates cottages are situated in the Silverdale and Arnside Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. As you’d expect from an area officially listed as beautiful, the surrounding countryside is absolutely stunning and just waiting to be explored. There are so many things to do in Silverdale & Arnside, and walking is one of the best ways you can discover even more about the area. There are numerous walks around Morecambe Bay and even more walking routes around the wider Silverdale and Arnside area that cater for all abilities. We’ve gone through our favourite walks in Silverdale & Arnside below and hope it inspires your time away in one of our holiday cottages.

 

Arnside Knott 

Length: 2.5miles

Estimated walk time: 1 hour

Difficulty: Easy

Type: Circular

Located in Far Arnside, the Arnside Knott walk is around a small hill that offers stunning views over the bay, the River Kent, the southern Lake District and as far as Ingleborough when looking inland. The walk starts at the National Trust car park on Arnside Knott. As Arnside Knott is a hill, it does require some hill climbing but it’s all fairly straight forward.

The walk takes you on a loop around Arnside Knott, giving views around the surrounding area, including the Kent Viaduct, Grange-over-Sands and along the estuary. There are a number of benches to rest tired legs and take in the glorious views. If you’re looking for refreshments you’ll find them in nearby Arnside before or after the walk. Hollins Cottage is located at Hollins Farm which sits at the foot of Arnside Knott, meaning you can easily return for some peace and relaxation after you’ve completed the walk.

 

Gait Barrows Nature Reserve 

Length: 2miles

Estimated walk time: 50 minutes

Difficulty: Easy

Type: Circular

The Gait Barrows Nature Reserve is nestled in amongst extensive limestone landscapes. It’s a short distance from Silverdale and close to the larger Leighton Moss Nature Reserve too. The walking route around the nature reserve is ideal for a leisurely stroll and perfect for spotting wildlife and rare plants. The Lady’s Slipper Orchid, which is particularly rare, can be found here, so make sure to keep an eye out if you’re visiting during their main blooming season of November to March. The route takes you around the edge of Hawes water which is situated within the reserve and starts at the Gait Barrows car park.

 

Warton Crag

Length: 7.3 miles

Estimated walk time: 3.5-4.5 hours

Difficulty: Moderate

Type: Circular

This walk takes in a large chunk of the southern tip of the area and explores the Warton Crag. Overall the walking is fairly easy, despite the slightly longer distance, but some of the walking on Warton Crag itself may involve a little scrambling that some may find more difficult. You’ll start at the car park at Quaker’s Stang before making your way to Warton Crag. The walk is a mixture of road, woodland and open green spaces. It offers views of impressive limestone crags, Morecambe bay and down to Warton village and Silverdale.

There’s another car park at Warton Crag so you can always make this walk shorter if you want.

 

Eaves Wood

Length: 2.5 miles

Estimated walk time: 1 hour

Difficulty: Easy

Type: There and back again – with a loop

Located between Gait Barrows Nature Reserve and the Silverdale itself, you’ll find the picturesque Eaves Wood. The Eaves Wood walk takes you from the National Trust car park, through the Eaves Wood and up to the Pepperpot, a monument built to celebrate Queen Victoria’s silver jubilee, on top of King William’s Hill. Alongside the beautiful woodland, you’ll find limestone pavements and views across the area. On the return leg, you can make a loop within the woodlands before rejoining the main path.

This walk is really close to Silverdale and all of the amenities it has to offer, like pubs and cafes.

 

Silverdale

Length: 2 miles

Estimated walk time: 2 hours

Difficulty: Easy

Type: Circular

This walk takes in the picturesque town of Silverdale along with the beautiful coastline of the Morecambe Bay, a lime kiln, Lindeth tower and the wonderful view from the giant stone seat on Jack Scout. The walking is relatively easy but it’s worth checking the tide times, as some areas may be awkward or inaccessible at high tide. As this walk starts and finishes in Silverdale itself, you’ll find a number of options for refreshments to pick from, whether you want a pub or a cafe. Our holiday cottages The Knott and The Pepperpot are in the centre of Silverdale village which are perfect for exploring walks like this one.